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When Is a Goopy Eye a Problem?

Pet chronic dry eye

Diagnosing Eye Problems in Pets

Many eye problems in dogs and cats can look the same, at first glance. Everything from allergies and dry eye to ulcers and glaucoma can look very similar. It is important to realize that any change in the way your pet’s eye looks can be an emergency.

If you notice a change in the way your pet’s eye looks, such as more discharge or redness, or if you see your pet blinking more or rubbing at his eye, it is critical that you have it evaluated by a veterinarian.

Your veterinarian will recommend tests so that the best medication can be prescribed that will heal your pet.

Many dogs have thick eye discharge. Sometimes it is just in the morning; sometimes it has to do with a dog’s breed. Some breeds of dogs have eyes that sit differently in their skull, causing more discharge. And, sometimes, the goopy eye is a sign of a severe, chronic and painful condition called keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). KCS is commonly called chronic dry eye.

KCS, or Chronic Dry Eye, Symptoms

Often, the only thing owners notice is thick white or yellow discharge from one or both eyes. In other dogs, the white part of the eye, the sclera, can also be red, and the dog may rub at their eyes. In haired breeds, the hair around the eye often becomes matted with discharge from the eyes.

The Schirmer Tear Test

This condition can be easily confused with other eye conditions, such as allergies, unless the appropriate diagnostic tests are done. KCS is easily diagnosed with a test called the Schirmer Tear Test. This test takes 1 minute per eye and uses a little piece of paper to measure how much tear the eye produces. If the eye doesn’t produce enough tears, the answer is clear!

Effects of Untreated KCS

If it goes untreated, KCS can cause permanent corneal scarring, corneal ulcers, darkening of the cornea, and chronic pain. Many dogs will lose their vision due to these severe changes, and some dogs will even become aggressive or sensitive about their heads/ faces being touched because of the pain.

Adult onset KCS (acquired KCS) is often due to an inappropriate immune response. Treatment is a lifelong regime of eye drops that allow the eye to produce tears again. Supplemental moisturizing eye drops can also be used.

With appropriate treatment, the condition is manageable, and the health of the eye can be saved.  And, most important, the pet that is suffering from this disease will be comfortable, pain free, and happy.

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Testimonial

Don't take a good vet for granted, that's what I say. I currently live in another state and have taken my 10 year old dog to numerous vets over the years (California, Colorado, Vegas, and then some). Never have I ever received the attention and care I've gotten w/Dr. Hines. Within the past 3 months alone, my dog went to 3 different vets for a horrible and painful skin problem that broke out all over her body.

The first vet: I spent more time ponying up the $175 for the visit than the Dr. spent actually looking at my dog. He performed a woods lamp exam for ringworm. Even without Google or a veterinary degree, I could tell it wasn't ringworm. Thanks for taking my money.
Second vet: "Here's some spray, now here's your bill. Bring her back in two weeks so I can charge you another visit." No tests, nothing.
Between the two, I felt like I got nowhere. No definitive answer on why this affected my dog and the medication given wasn't even for a diagnosed condition. Just some general topical spray. I could have bought it at Petsmart and saved myself the time and money.
Recently, on a visit to Idaho, I planned ahead to bring my dog to the Rupert Animal Clinic. I asked the same questions, had the same concerns and now have different results. Dr. Hines gave me options on what route to take, ran appropriate tests and communicated with me every step of the way (even calling me personally when test results came in). My primary concern was cancer. Our dog is like our child- we'll pay the money if we can keep her healthy and safe. In the future, I've resolved to bring my dog to Rupert Animal Clinic on our annual trip for all of her exams. I know she won't be treated as a little cash cow to exploit an owner's love for pets.

Sung L.
Rupert, ID

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