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Pet Therapy

helpful dog

How Your Pet Can Help Others

While you may not require pet therapy, your pet may be able to help someone else suffering from a health problem or disorder. Your pet will have to take part in a selection process to determine if he or she is suitable for therapy. First, your pet will undergo a physical exam to ensure that it is immunized and disease free. From there, your pet will be trained in obedience, patient interaction and temperament before being considered for certification.

If you feel your pet may be a good candidate for pet therapy, contact your veterinarian for more information or for suggestions on who to contact to discuss training and qualifications.

Are you dealing with extreme levels of emotional stress, exhaustion or depression? If so, pet therapy might be right for you. Companionship is only one of the many benefits pet therapy provides. Keep reading to find out what pet therapy involves, which conditions it can help treat and why you might benefit from it.

What Is Pet Therapy?

You may have heard the term “pet therapy” before, but do you know what it entails? Pet therapy is a guided interaction between a trained animal and a person. It is often a good way to help the latter cope with a health problem or disorder. Cats and dogs are the most common animals involved in pet therapy, but others can also participate in the program. Horses, fish, guinea pigs and dolphins are just a few of the many animals known to assist in therapy.

What Conditions Can It Help Treat?

The first step in pursuing pet therapy is to visit your doctor to determine if this is the best treatment option for your needs. If pet therapy is appropriate for you, your doctor will recommend the next steps to take.

Individuals suffering from the following conditions have benefited from pet therapy:

  • Addiction
  • Cancer
  • Dementia
  • Emotional or behavioral disorders
  • Chronic pain
  • Psychiatric disorders

While pet therapy is known to assist individuals with any of the listed conditions, it is not limited to them. If you feel that you may benefit from pet therapy, please contact your doctor to discuss the matter further.

How Can It Help Me?

Pet therapy has been credited with many benefits that stem from cultivating a strong bond between a human and an animal. Here are some of the benefits associated with pet therapy:

  • Increased focus and attention
  • Reduced anxiety, fear and isolation
  • Reduced blood pressure, depression and risk of a heart attack or stroke
  • Improved social skills
  • Increase in trust and empathy

Another benefit of a pet therapy program is that it enhances a human’s ability to bond with animals, which promotes emotional awareness, compassion and social skills. As a result, participants are often less hesitant about undergoing medical treatments for their health condition. 

Exclusive Offer

New patients get 50% OFF office call!

Sign-up using the form or call us at 208-436-9818 to take advantage of this exclusive offer.

THIS ---->https://rupertanimalcliniccom.vetmatrixbase.com/index.php

Office Hours

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday8:00am5:30pm
Tuesday8:00am5:30pm
Wednesday8:00am5:30pm
Thursday8:00am5:30pm
Friday8:00am5:30pm
Saturday8:00am1:00pm
SundayClosedClosed
Day Morning Afternoon
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
8:00am 8:00am 8:00am 8:00am 8:00am 8:00am Closed
5:30pm 5:30pm 5:30pm 5:30pm 5:30pm 1:00pm Closed

Testimonial

Don't take a good vet for granted, that's what I say. I currently live in another state and have taken my 10 year old dog to numerous vets over the years (California, Colorado, Vegas, and then some). Never have I ever received the attention and care I've gotten w/Dr. Hines. Within the past 3 months alone, my dog went to 3 different vets for a horrible and painful skin problem that broke out all over her body.

The first vet: I spent more time ponying up the $175 for the visit than the Dr. spent actually looking at my dog. He performed a woods lamp exam for ringworm. Even without Google or a veterinary degree, I could tell it wasn't ringworm. Thanks for taking my money.
Second vet: "Here's some spray, now here's your bill. Bring her back in two weeks so I can charge you another visit." No tests, nothing.
Between the two, I felt like I got nowhere. No definitive answer on why this affected my dog and the medication given wasn't even for a diagnosed condition. Just some general topical spray. I could have bought it at Petsmart and saved myself the time and money.
Recently, on a visit to Idaho, I planned ahead to bring my dog to the Rupert Animal Clinic. I asked the same questions, had the same concerns and now have different results. Dr. Hines gave me options on what route to take, ran appropriate tests and communicated with me every step of the way (even calling me personally when test results came in). My primary concern was cancer. Our dog is like our child- we'll pay the money if we can keep her healthy and safe. In the future, I've resolved to bring my dog to Rupert Animal Clinic on our annual trip for all of her exams. I know she won't be treated as a little cash cow to exploit an owner's love for pets.

Sung L.
Rupert, ID

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