WARNING

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Close [x]

Keeping Pets Safe from Being Lost

Did You Know?

While some pet owners believe the best information to tattoo a pet with is their social security number, this information does not help the average person who finds a lost pet.

The microchip is so small it is comparable to a grain of rice. Your pet will never feel the chip or know it is there once we place it. Even though your pet does not have to be anesthetized to place the microchip, you may want to consider having it placed while they are under anesthesia for another procedure such as spaying or neutering.

An estimated one third of all pets will become lost at some point in their life. Reasons for pets becoming lost include everything from a loose gate to breaking free from a leash. With so many possible ways for a pet to become lost, it is important to follow some simple safety procedures.

Dog Tags (Identification Tags)
Keep an up-to-date "dog-tag" on your pet's collar, even when they are in the house. The first place someone who finds your pet will look for information is the collar. If your pet escapes the house, you will want them to have their collar on them with their information.

If necessary, make up more than one identification tag to include all of your pet's information. This includes your address, your phone number, work number, cell number, or any other number you have that will reach a member of your family. Other information should include our information as your pet's veterinarian (which is included on all rabies tags.) You do not need to include your pet's name on the tag. There are people who steal pets and this might offer them a chance to lure your pet. Place the word "REWARD" on all tags where you would place your pet's name.

Tattoos and Microchips
One method of finding out information about a pet is through micro chipping. A microchip is a specialized information holder inserted under the skin in your pets back. When scanned, the chip will give the scanner all of your pet's information, including information on their humans and how to return your pet. Most veterinarians and shelters have these specialized scanners, though if someone else finds your pet, they will have to locate someone with a scanner before you will be contacted.

Because not everyone owns a microchip scanner, some pet owners opt to have their pet tattooed. The tattoo is placed, while your pet is under anesthesia, on the inside of their thigh or in their ear. An identification number and a phone number of a pet registry are tattooed.

If you find a lost animal, lay them down on their side and examine them for a tattoo. It might be necessary to trim some of the hair that has grown over the tattoo. Contact us if you find a pet and cannot read the tattoo.

Always Use a Leash
Unless you are in a fenced in yard, always use a leash when traveling anywhere with your pet. Your pet might be well behaved, but they may forget the rules if they see something interesting in the distance, such as another animal.


Keep Cats Indoors
Unlike their K-9 counterparts, cats can jump fences and climb trees. For this reason, cats should be kept as an indoor pet. It is best to teach your cat to stay indoors when they are young. Older cats can get confused and forget the way home.

Pets are a part of the family. Taking precautions and keeping an eye on your pet will help keep them safe at home.

Exclusive Offer

New patients get 50% OFF office call!

Sign-up using the form or call us at 208-436-9818 to take advantage of this exclusive offer.

THIS ---->https://rupertanimalcliniccom.vetmatrixbase.com/index.php

Office Hours

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday8:00am5:30pm
Tuesday8:00am5:30pm
Wednesday8:00am5:30pm
Thursday8:00am5:30pm
Friday8:00am5:30pm
Saturday8:00am1:00pm
SundayClosedClosed
Day Morning Afternoon
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
8:00am 8:00am 8:00am 8:00am 8:00am 8:00am Closed
5:30pm 5:30pm 5:30pm 5:30pm 5:30pm 1:00pm Closed

Testimonial

Don't take a good vet for granted, that's what I say. I currently live in another state and have taken my 10 year old dog to numerous vets over the years (California, Colorado, Vegas, and then some). Never have I ever received the attention and care I've gotten w/Dr. Hines. Within the past 3 months alone, my dog went to 3 different vets for a horrible and painful skin problem that broke out all over her body.

The first vet: I spent more time ponying up the $175 for the visit than the Dr. spent actually looking at my dog. He performed a woods lamp exam for ringworm. Even without Google or a veterinary degree, I could tell it wasn't ringworm. Thanks for taking my money.
Second vet: "Here's some spray, now here's your bill. Bring her back in two weeks so I can charge you another visit." No tests, nothing.
Between the two, I felt like I got nowhere. No definitive answer on why this affected my dog and the medication given wasn't even for a diagnosed condition. Just some general topical spray. I could have bought it at Petsmart and saved myself the time and money.
Recently, on a visit to Idaho, I planned ahead to bring my dog to the Rupert Animal Clinic. I asked the same questions, had the same concerns and now have different results. Dr. Hines gave me options on what route to take, ran appropriate tests and communicated with me every step of the way (even calling me personally when test results came in). My primary concern was cancer. Our dog is like our child- we'll pay the money if we can keep her healthy and safe. In the future, I've resolved to bring my dog to Rupert Animal Clinic on our annual trip for all of her exams. I know she won't be treated as a little cash cow to exploit an owner's love for pets.

Sung L.
Rupert, ID

Newsletter Sign Up