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Microchipping Your Pet

microchip pets

Tags vs. Microchipping 

Many people question the need for a microchip if their pet already has a collar tag, and vice versa.

The truth is, microchipping is only one part of the equation. Your pet should always have a collar with an identification tag, as well as an implanted microchip. There is no guarantee that the person who finds your lost pet will know to bring your pet to a local animal hospital or shelter, where they can look for and scan a microchip.

This is why it is best to also put tags on your pet that include your phone number and, if you would like, an address. Make sure the phone number listed is associated with a voicemail or answering machine, so, if someone calls when you are not available, they can leave you a message.

Want to Know More?

If you have any questions about microchipping or the best way to protect your pet from getting lost, contact us to learn more.  

Each year, nearly 8 million animals end up in local shelters. Of those 8 million pets, data shows that less than 20 percent of lost dogs and less than 2 percent of missing cats are ever returned to their original owners.

Thankfully, there are some useful tools available to help pet owners who have lost their pets find them again — including microchips. Having your pets microchipped is one of the best ways to increase the chance that you will be reunited with them, should they ever go missing.  

What Is Microchipping?

A microchip is a very small, radio-frequency identification transponder. Microchipping your pet involves placing an identification chip in your pet’s shoulder area. A needle is used to place the chip under the animal’s skin.

It only takes a few seconds for a veterinarian to implant a microchip under your pet’s skin. In fact, many owners choose to have this procedure done while their pet is being neutered or spayed to save time and reduce any discomfort to their pet. The procedure itself is performed with a large, sterilized needle and does not seriously injure or hurt your pet.

How It Works

Each microchip is programmed with a unique identification number that links your pet to your home address and contact information. This information can be picked up when the microchip is scanned by a specific scanning machine that is used by many veterinary clinics and animal shelters.

Some people think that a microchip works similarly to a tracker or GPS device. However, it only works when someone scans the chip on the proper frequency. Different scanners read different frequencies. Because of this, a microchip is only as good as the information registered to it. It is important to make sure the chip is registered to you and that your updated phone number and address is attached to it, so your pet can be returned to you.

Why Is Microchipping Your Pet Important?

The American Humane Association estimates that more than 10 million cats and dogs are lost or stolen in the United States each year.

If someone finds your lost pet and takes him to a local veterinary clinic or animal shelter, a microchip is one of the best ways to guarantee that he ends up back in your arms. 

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Testimonial

Don't take a good vet for granted, that's what I say. I currently live in another state and have taken my 10 year old dog to numerous vets over the years (California, Colorado, Vegas, and then some). Never have I ever received the attention and care I've gotten w/Dr. Hines. Within the past 3 months alone, my dog went to 3 different vets for a horrible and painful skin problem that broke out all over her body.

The first vet: I spent more time ponying up the $175 for the visit than the Dr. spent actually looking at my dog. He performed a woods lamp exam for ringworm. Even without Google or a veterinary degree, I could tell it wasn't ringworm. Thanks for taking my money.
Second vet: "Here's some spray, now here's your bill. Bring her back in two weeks so I can charge you another visit." No tests, nothing.
Between the two, I felt like I got nowhere. No definitive answer on why this affected my dog and the medication given wasn't even for a diagnosed condition. Just some general topical spray. I could have bought it at Petsmart and saved myself the time and money.
Recently, on a visit to Idaho, I planned ahead to bring my dog to the Rupert Animal Clinic. I asked the same questions, had the same concerns and now have different results. Dr. Hines gave me options on what route to take, ran appropriate tests and communicated with me every step of the way (even calling me personally when test results came in). My primary concern was cancer. Our dog is like our child- we'll pay the money if we can keep her healthy and safe. In the future, I've resolved to bring my dog to Rupert Animal Clinic on our annual trip for all of her exams. I know she won't be treated as a little cash cow to exploit an owner's love for pets.

Sung L.
Rupert, ID

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